Wednesday, February 28, 2007
OK, I'm done downloading the March CTP of Orcas. Everyone else can go ahead. Thanks for your patience. :-)


posted on Wednesday, February 28, 2007 4:50:29 PM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)  #    Comments [1]

kick it on DotNetKicks.com
The Orcas March CTP is out! You can get the installer version here and the VPC image here. This is first CTP that has all of the features from last May's LINQ Preview. IOW, this is a big one!

On a side note, I would appreciate everyone waiting to download until I'm finished so that I can maximize my bandwidth. TIA! ;-)

posted on Wednesday, February 28, 2007 9:18:15 AM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)  #    Comments [2]

kick it on DotNetKicks.com
 Thursday, February 22, 2007
C# 3.0 Lambda expressions have distinct advantages over C# 2.0 anonymous methods. This article takes a look at how using lambda expressions can improve the compiler's type inference for generic methods.
posted on Thursday, February 22, 2007 6:10:30 AM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)  #    Comments [2]

kick it on DotNetKicks.com
 Monday, February 19, 2007
At first, the syntax of C# 3.0 lambda expressions can be a bit intimidating. This article unravels the syntax to show that they are really anonymous methods on steroids.
posted on Monday, February 19, 2007 9:50:11 AM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)  #    Comments [1]

kick it on DotNetKicks.com
 Tuesday, February 13, 2007
Are you confused by all of the talk about functional programming going on in the world of C# these days? If so, maybe it's time to play a little catch up.

There are a lot of resources available that you can go to but the most valuable that I've found are the video lectures by Hal Abelson and Gerald Jay Sussman from MIT's Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs course. These lectures were given in 1986 and may look a bit dated (I saw one guy in the class that looks like "Rusty" from "National Lampoon's Vacation") but the content is fantastic.

You can download the video lectures here.
posted on Tuesday, February 13, 2007 10:37:27 AM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)  #    Comments [0]

kick it on DotNetKicks.com
 Monday, February 12, 2007
It looks like I'll be giving two talks at this year's Cincinnati/Dayton Code Camp on March 24th:

Back to the Basics -- Writing Quality Code
Delegates and Events -- The Inside Story

I hope to see you there!


posted on Monday, February 12, 2007 9:19:48 AM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)  #    Comments [2]

kick it on DotNetKicks.com
Continuing my series on functional programming ideas, this article looks at the functional programming technique of "automatic memoization" and shows how it can be used to great effect in C# 2.0.
posted on Monday, February 12, 2007 8:28:24 AM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)  #    Comments [1]

kick it on DotNetKicks.com
 Friday, February 09, 2007
I will be presenting at the Ann Arbor Dot Net Developers Group on March 14, 2007. This will be a new talk entitled "Delegates and Events -- The Inside Story". Here's the abstract:

"This in-depth talk takes a look beneath the hood to see exactly how .NET delegates and events work. Armed with this knowledge, we will examine ways to use delegates which might not be immediately obvious. Topics covered include: asynchronous delegates, custom-firing of events, weak delegates, anonymous delegates and lambda expressions. Throughout the session, potential performance and memory issues with delegates will be highlighted."

If you're in the area, feel free to drop by.

posted on Friday, February 09, 2007 11:21:16 AM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)  #    Comments [1]

kick it on DotNetKicks.com
Closures are an important concept to understand as they underpin many functional programming techniques. This article peeks under the hood to see how closures are implemented in C# and discusses some ways in which they are extremely useful for producing robust code.
posted on Friday, February 09, 2007 10:47:06 AM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)  #    Comments [1]

kick it on DotNetKicks.com
 Thursday, February 08, 2007
After a bit of hiatus, I am long overdue to get some code up on this blog. To give myself some direction, this is the start of an informal series that will attempt to shed some light on the functional programming ideas that have been sneaking into the C# world. In this article, I tinker with the classic Fibonacci number sequence and how to calculate them with lightning fast, thread-safe code using closures in C# 2.0.
posted on Thursday, February 08, 2007 11:51:48 AM (Pacific Standard Time, UTC-08:00)  #    Comments [3]

kick it on DotNetKicks.com